Monday, May 27th, 2019

Officials: Overdue California Earthquake Will Kill 13,000

Published on October 4, 2016 by   ·   2 Comments

a recent prediction by fema suggests that 13 000   people will die when the cascadia fault line finally blows

neonettle

A recent prediction by FEMA suggests that 13,000 + people will die when the cascadia fault line finally blows which result in the worst earthquake of all time. The chances? That’s one in three within the next 50 years.

Scientists predict that people will need to “escape on foot” as the roads will liquefy making travelling by any sort of vehicle near enough impossible.

Scientist have also suggested that if you hear a dog barking it will be a heavier indicator as dogs react to compressional waves (unheard by the human ear) – people will then have a time frame of 20 minutes to escape to higher ground.

NewYorker Reports: Most people in the United States know just one fault line by name: the San Andreas, which runs nearly the length of California and is perpetually rumored to be on the verge of unleashing “the big one.” That rumor is misleading, no matter what the San Andreas ever does. Every fault line has an upper limit to its potency, determined by its length and width, and by how far it can slip. For the San Andreas, one of the most extensively studied and best understood fault lines in the world, that upper limit is roughly an 8.2—a powerful earthquake, but, because the Richter scale is logarithmic, only six per cent as strong as the 2011 event in Japan.

ust north of the San Andreas, however, lies another fault line. Known as theCascadia subduction zone, it runs for seven hundred miles off the coast of the Pacific Northwest, beginning near Cape Mendocino, California, continuing along Oregon and Washington, and terminating around Vancouver Island, Canada. The “Cascadia” part of its name comes from the Cascade Range, a chain of volcanic mountains that follow the same course a hundred or so miles inland. The “subduction zone” part refers to a region of the planet where one tectonic plate is sliding underneath (subducting) another. Tectonic plates are those slabs of mantle and crust that, in their epochs-long drift, rearrange the earth’s continents and oceans. Most of the time, their movement is slow, harmless, and all but undetectable. Occasionally, at the borders where they meet, it is not.

Take your hands and hold them palms down, middle fingertips touching. Your right hand represents the North American tectonic plate, which bears on its back, among other things, our entire continent, from One World Trade Center to the Space Needle, in Seattle. Your left hand represents an oceanic plate called Juan de Fuca, ninety thousand square miles in size. The place where they meet is the Cascadia subduction zone. Now slide your left hand under your right one. That is what the Juan de Fuca plate is doing: slipping steadily beneath North America. When you try it, your right hand will slide up your left arm, as if you were pushing up your sleeve. That is what North America is not doing. It is stuck, wedged tight against the surface of the other plate.

Read More HERE

 

 

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Readers Comments (2)

  1. Bruce Bousman says:

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