Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019

Scientists Panic As Sun Goes Completely Blank

Published on June 30, 2016 by   ·   No Comments

Scientists concerned as Sun goes completely blank for first time in 100 years

Yournewswire

Scientists have expressed concern over the fact that the Sun has gone completely blank for the second time this month, something it hasn’t done for 100 years. 

On June 4th the sun went completely ‘dark’ without any spots on visible, and has remained almost completely blank for the last few weeks.

Vencoreweather.com reports:

The blank sun is a sign that the next solar minimum is approaching and there will be an increasing number of spotless days over the next few years.

At first, the blankness will stretch for just a few days at a time, then it’ll continue for weeks at a time, and finally it should last for months at a time when the sunspot cycle reaches its nadir. The next solar minimum phase is expected to take place around 2019 or 2020.

The current solar cycle is the 24th since 1755 when extensive recording of solar sunspot activity began and is the weakest in more than a century with the fewest sunspots since cycle 14 peaked in February 1906.

Solar cycle 24

The sun goes through a natural solar cycle approximately every 11 years. The cycle is marked by the increase and decrease of sunspots which are visible dark regions on the sun’s surface and cooler than surroundings. The greatest number of sunspots in any given solar cycle is designated as the “solar maximum” and the lowest number is referred to as the “solar minimum” phase. We are currently more than seven years into Solar Cycle 24 and it appears the solar maximum of this cycle was reached in April 2014 during a spike in activity (current location indicated by arrow).  Going back to 1755, there have been only a few solar cycles in the previous 23 that have had a lower number of sunspots during its maximum phase.  The peak of activity in April 2014 was actually a second peak in solar cycle 24 that surpassed the level of an earlier peak which occurred in March 2012.  While many solar cycles are double-peaked, this is the first one in which the second peak in sunspot number was larger than the first peak.  The sunspot number plot (above) shows a clear weakening trend in solar cycles since solar cycle 22 peaked around 1990.

Read More HERE

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