Sunday, May 26th, 2019

The Hidden Meaning of the Starbucks Logo

Published on November 15, 2015 by   ·   No Comments

Starbucks Cups

Jennifer Sodini/Waking Times

Starbucks’ decision to stay “holiday neutral” on their cups this year has been a point of contention and a heated conversation over the past few days, agitating many to believe that this decision was an intentional “war on Christmas” (see: Red Cup Controversy).

According to Jeffrey Fields, VP of Starbucks, the concept was for the holiday cups to be a blank canvas, allowing customers to create their own stories, “inspired by the doodles and designs that customers have drawn on white cups for years.” Stating:

“In the past, we have told stories with our holiday cups designs,” Jeffrey Fields, Starbucks vice president of Design & Content, said in a statement. “This year we wanted to usher in the holidays with a purity of design that welcomes all of our stories.”

What is interesting to note, is that the whole “red cup” controversy is pretty silly when you take into account that since the inception of Starbucks – their logo (which emblazons every cup) actually is highly esoteric in nature.

While The Little Mermaid portrays Ariel as a quirky, curious, beauty with hopes of exploring the world…according to Greek mythology, mermaids, or sirens, were predatory seductresses that would seduce sailors with songs and promises of sex – and then kill them.

Starbucks 1

The original Starbucks logo had a twin-tailed mermaid, known as Melusine. According to Wikipedia the tale of Melusine is as follows:

The tale was translated into German in 1456 by Thüring von Ringoltingen, the version of which became popular as a chapbook. It was later translated into English c. 1500, and often printed in both the 15th century and the 16th century. A prose version is entitled the Chronique de la princesse (Chronicle of the Princess).

It tells how in the time of the Crusades, Elynas, the King of Albany (an old name forScotland or Alba), went hunting one day and came across a beautiful lady in the forest. She was Pressyne, mother of Melusine. He persuaded her to marry him but she agreed, only on the promise — for there is often a hard and fatal condition attached to any pairing of fay and mortal — that he must not enter her chamber when she birthed or bathed her children. She gave birth to triplets. When he violated this taboo, Pressyne left the kingdom, together with her three daughters, and traveled to the lost Isle of Avalon.

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