Tuesday, August 20th, 2019

Why is Wheat Such a Problem in the Modern Diet?

Published on October 27, 2015 by   ·   1 Comment

GM-Wheat 

Catherine J. Frompovich

Wheat, which used to be considered a “staff of life,” in recent times, has become a dietary scourge for numerous men, women, and children. What happened, especially when there are so many processed foods that contain wheat or wheat derivatives?

First and foremost, we ought to realize that wheat grown today is a hybridized version of heirloom wheat during the early 20th century. Einkorn [1], which probably was the oldest variety of wheat known and grown for thousands of years, has fallen out of favor even though it contains a lower percentage of gluten.

According to Tropical Traditions’ article, “Einkorn Ancient Grain,”

Since einkorn is such an ancient grain and the only known diploid classified variety of wheat still known to exist today, there has been considerable interest in the issue of gluten toxicity. One way of measuring gluten toxicity is by the gliadin to glutenin ratio, and einkorn has a much more favorable ratio than modern wheat varieties. Einkorn has a gliadin to glutenin ratio of 2:1 compared to 0.8:1 for durum and hard red wheat. While this lower gluten ratio may hold some promise for gluten intolerance disorders, it should be cautioned that einkorn DOES contain gluten, and so those desiring to avoid all gluten are NOT recommended to consume einkorn. [1]

Gliadin is another classification of proteins in grains, e.g., wheat, whereas glutenin is the major protein in wheat (47%). Gluten is an elastic-like protein remaining after the starches are washed away. Numerous vegetarian “meats” are made with “Seitan” [2].

As Tropical Traditions explains, “Einkorn has a gliadin to glutenin ratio of 2:1 compared to 0.8:1 for durum and hard red wheat. Old Ways Whole Grains Council says [3],

Different types of wheat have different numbers of chromosomes, and some studies show that the older wheats, with fewer chromosomes, tend to have lower levels of gliadins, the type of gluten proteins that seem to cause most sensitivities.

wheatEinkorn, the oldest known type of wheat in our current food supply, has just 14 chromosomes, and is called a diploid wheat. Durum wheat (the kind most often used for pasta) and emmer are tetraploid wheats, with 28 chromosomes. Common wheat (used for most everything) and spelt have 42 chromosomes and are known as hexaploid wheats.Research shows that different tetraploid and hexaploid wheat varieties differ widely in gliadin levels, and it’s possible to select “individual genotypes with less Celiac Disease-immunogenic potential.”

Some heirloom wheat varieties grew very tall and were not manageable for industrial farming practices, so newer varieties were developed in the 1950s and 1960s by Norman Borlaug, father of the Green Revolution.

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Readers Comments (1)

  1. Cyndy Price Cyndy Price says:

    GOV. FUCKIN WITH ALL OUR FOOD!!!!




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