Friday, April 18th, 2014

Breakthrough: Blind Man’s Sight Restored With Stem Cell Therapy

Published on December 24, 2012 by   ·   No Comments

 

eye

CTVNews.ca Staff/CTV

When Taylor Binns slowly began going blind because of complications with his contact lenses, he started to prepare for living the rest of his life without vision. But an innovative treatment using stem cells has changed all that, and returned to him the gift of sight.

Four years ago, while on a humanitarian work mission to Haiti, Binns developed intense eye pain and increasingly blurry vision. Doctors at home couldn’t figure out what was wrong and, over the next two years, Binns slowly went legally blind, no longer able to drive or read from his textbooks at Queens University, where he was studying commerce.

“Everything you could do before was being taken away, day by day, and it got worse and worse,” he recalls.

Doctors finally diagnosed him with a rare eye disease called corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, which was causing the normal cells on Binns’ corneas to be replaced with scar tissue, leading to painful eye ulcers that clouded over his corneas.

A variety of things can cause the condition, including chemical and thermal burns to the corneas, which are the glass “domes” over the coloured part of our eyes. But it’s also thought that microbial infections and wearing daily wear contact lenses for too long without properly disinfecting them can lead to the disease, too.

Since a corneal transplant was not an option for Binns, hisdoctors at Toronto Western Hospital proposed something new: a limbal stem cell transplant.

The limbus is the border area between the cornea and the whites of the eye where the eye normally creates new epithelial cells. Since Binns’ limbus was damaged, doctors hoped that giving him healthy limbal cells from a donor would cause healthy new cells to grow over the surface.

While the treatment is available in certain centres around the U.S., Binns became the first patient to try the treatment at a new program at Toronto WesternHospital.

Though Binns knew he’d need to take anti-rejection drugs, he decided the procedure was worth a try.

“The alternative was to live in constant pain all my life,” he says. “So there really wasn’t anything to lose.”

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